BEST COVERS: ARLO PARKS ‘CREEP’

British singer and poet Arlo Parks has shared a beautiful cover of Radiohead’s cult classic hit ‘Creep’. The South London artist also released a poem inspired by the track, expressing to her fans that “the last few weeks absorbing art has been saving my life”.

Introducing…Crooked Colours

They may not be one of Australia’s most recognisable acts, but fittingly for their understated sound, they’re a group that’s been quietly chalking up some major achievements since emerging from Perth in 2015.

Their underrated debut album Vera had genuine streaming hits (‘Flow’ is up to 18 million plays and counting) and took some interesting risks (like linking up with Ivan Ooze on ‘I Hope You Get It’) and sought to solidify a sonic style – a blend of downtempo dance music with melodic sensibilities and live instrumentation and sampling.

Their slow-burning sound doesn’t hit you straight away, but its designed to intoxicate you – a spell that’s very difficult to shake off once its effect does take hold.

That bewitching element runs even deeper on their second album Langata, which posits Crooked Colours to follow in the footsteps of RÜFÜS DU SOL or Mansionair – Australian electronic trios who’ve built a following overseas with their meticulous production and a live show that lives up to that sonic.

 

4Ever Songs: Frankie Goes To Hollywood ‘Relax’

“Relax, don’t do it, when you want to suck it to it. Relax, don’t do it, when you want to come…” While these words provided ample excuse for BBC Radio and TV to impose a ban on the joyously hypnotic 1983 debut single by Frankie Goes To Hollywood, they also served as a mid-’80s anthem during an era when homo-eroticism became an intrinsic component of the Britpop scene. Thanks to a suitably lewd S&M promo video that, predictably, was also barred from the airwaves, along with a massive marketing campaign that saw kids all over the UK wearing T-shirts with the slogan ‘Frankie Says Relax’, the band rode a short-lived wave of high-profile controversy. Yet of far longer-lasting impact was the music behind all the hype — a hi-NRG brand of dance-synth-pop that, as crafted by production supremo Trevor Horn, broke new sonic ground, while epitomising ’80s excess in all its garish, overblown glory.

The muses of La Musa: Alex The Astronaut

Sydney songwriter, Alex The Astronaut is on the opposite side of the world studying a Maths and Physics degree on a soccer scholarship in New York. That’s not a combination of words you’ll hear every day. She’s an incredible story-teller who’s able to weave clever lyrics into beautifully layed out songs. She’s also the perfect person to talk to a generation right now.

Alex The Astronaut has always had a supernatural knack for capturing human experience in song. On The Theory Of Absolutely Nothing , she explores friendship, love, loss, pain and change, weaving a constellation of stories about the personal reckonings that come with growing up.

Divus Julius presents: Will Butler

William Butler is an American multi-instrumentalist and composer who is best known as a core member of the indie rock band Arcade Fire. He is the brother of Arcade Fire frontman Win Butler.

American music—in the tradition of the Violent Femmes, The Breeders, The Modern Lovers, Bob Dylan, Smokey Robinson, The Magnetic Fields, Ghostface Killah. Music where the holy fool runs afoul of the casual world.

With his new solo album ‘Generations’ our on 25th September, Arcade Fire’s Will Butler is unveiling the latest taste of what to expect, releasing new track ‘Bethlehem’.

Hit of the week: Pixey ‘Just Move’

Rising Liverpool-based artist Pixey is surrounded by glitz and glamour in 90s cinematic aesthetics in her new single and video “Just Move.” With its swollen beats, “Just Move” breathes into you like a dance fever. The only irony in this whole party mood is that Pixey is dancing solo in the video, capturing the isolation that we’ve been living with this year.

 

Music by Bergman: Everything Everything

If you try to explain Everything Everything on paper, their slow-but-sure rise to becoming one of the country’s biggest art-pop bands seems perplexing. Perhaps only alt-J can claim to have become a bigger band over the past 10 years while being as fundamentally weird as the Manchester four-piece.

Ever since their early singles ‘MY KZ UR BF’ and ‘Photoshop Handsome’ arrived at the start of the decade, followed on second album ‘Arc’ by ‘Cough Cough’ and ‘Kemosabe’, the group became owners of a handful of unlikely festival anthems. Their erratic, bizarre pop songs tapped into a confusing but satisfying sweet spot; you couldn’t quite understand how it worked, or what actual words you were trying to sing at the front of a sweaty festival tent – but it’s always a lot fun.

The band then took a surprisingly big leap forwards on 2015’s ‘Get To Heaven’, with the likes of ‘Distant Past’, ‘Spring / Summer / Winter / Dread’ and ‘No Reptiles’ becoming instant fan favourites. This time, they’d twisted their oddball concoctions into even bigger pop hits, which was furthered on their last album, 2017’s ‘A Fever Dream’. While not quite hitting the airwaves in the same way as ‘Get To Heaven’, its glorious, soaring title track and the paranoid ‘Ivory Tower’ brought more moments of euphoria for the subsequent arena tours. Now they release their new brand album ‘re-Animator.’

Radio Magazine about Barcelona's indie and alternative music & culture scene. Live broadcast every Thursday from 10.00PM to 11.00PM and Saturdays from 1.00PM t0 2.00PM at Barcelona FM 100.5