Category Archives: Música

The muses of The Musa: Erykah Badu

The tectonic plates move every time Erykah Badu wants them to. The first and strongest earth tremor was her debut in 1997, Baduizm. All those nostalgic for soul classics agreed about the excellence of that game-changing album (Erykah was the last link in the Diana Ross-Ann Peebles-Chaka Khan chain), as did the gourmets of black pop who came from the school of Janet Jackson and TLC and even the hip hop generation understood that that R&B was another dialect of the same language. But the earthquakes didn’t start and end then: with Mama’s Gun and Worldwide Underground Ms Badu even took on black rock (a terrain usually reserved for imitators of Hendrix) and with the incredible diptych New Amerykah, she took on the world of p-funk. Now after years of studio silence, only interrupted by a few mixtapes, the queen of afro has come back to the studio and stages to remind us that her elegant live performances are like a reverse striptease: every note, every word and every collaborator that dresses her show, make her more sensual, more exposed and more… Erykah.

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Divus Julius presents…Arlie

Arlie, the band, came together on Vanderbilt campus in 2016. Their early singles “Big Fat Mouth” and “Didya Think” gained traction on Spotify’s curated indie playlists. And now, to much anticipation, the band has released its first EP. They call it “Wait.”

There’s something very “Vampire Weekend” about Arlie’s “Wait.” A band of recent college graduates releasing a debut project both technically mature and unabashedly youthful. Yet, where Vampire Weekend revels in its own Ivy League preppiness, Arlie projects a more playful, summery image of young adulthood. The result is an album that alludes just as much to The Beatles and The Beach Boys as it does to Arlie’s contemporary indie counterparts.

Hit of the week: ABC Dialect ‘The Heat’

The Argentinian newcomers Abc Dialect are turning up ‘The Heat’ with a brand new video for 2018 single ‘The Heat.’

It’s a head-bopper, body-popper right to the core, driven by a frankly delicious bassline and beat that’s drenched in groove by the dozen, as splashes of keys and soft stabs of guitar wash over the track like a disco wave. It’s effortlessly cool, and arguably made even icier by the fresh stylee oozing from the new accompanying reel.

Juxtaposing shots of the duo chilling out with mates in front of picturesque backdrops or off bowling (yep, bowling is definitely still cool) with psych-infused mirrored clips of the lads instrumentally doing their thang, it’s a vid that shows exactly what Abc Dialect are all about. Unadulterated, undeniable London style.

Music by Bergman: Pampa Folks

Paris-based quartet Pampa Folks  have released last year theirdebut album. Their music combines colors and influences of blues, rock, western, soul and psychedelic popshow. They show dreamy, alluring melodic temptation throughout their best track “Blind Silhouettes”. The track is an adventurous structural journey, though remaining melodically cohesive throughout. Spaghetti-western guitars embrace the first minute over a bouncy psych-friendly organ and harmonious vocals, with tinges of guitars and brass emerging past the one-minute mark. .

Best Covers: Fun Lovin’ Crimminals ‘Daylight’

A reworking of the Bobby Womack/Georgie Fame classic, ‘Daylight’ features a guest appearance from renowned vocalist Rowetta, of The Happy Mondays. ‘Daylight’ is the lead single lifted from forthcoming album ‘Another Mimosa’, set for release on January 18th 2019, in the 20th anniversary year of their cult album ‘Mimosa’. A variation on the theme of the 1999 album, which became a cult classic with Crims fans for featuring clever re-imaginings of classic covers, remixes and rarities, ‘Another Mimosa’ draws on their seminal influences from the last 20 years.

 

Introducing…Amyl & The Sniffers

Where were you in 1977, Amy Taylor? The foul-mouthed singer of Amyl & The Sniffers wasn’t even born! As a matter of fact she was still a long way off (her birth certificate says…1996). Thinking about it, at that time her parents were kids who didn’t even listen to punk rock, they listened to AC/DC and Fleetwood Mac. Even so, when you’re hit with the ten angry eruptions of Big Attraction & Giddy Up you could imagine that Amy has shared rehearsal rooms, stages and pyjama parties with Poly Styrene, Ari Up and Ana da Silva. That’s how pure her Brit-punk repertoire sounds. Or better said, Aussie-punk, as they’re from Australia and pray to The Saints, The New Christs and The Birthday Party.

The muses of La Musa: Yaeji

Kathy Yaeji Lees’ ever more crowded live appearances have become famous, among other things, for the way in which the artist picks up the mic and sings over the tracks she is playing. It isn’t a session, nor a pop concert, but a hybrid format that, against all odds, works. The method is also applied to her recordings, in which the non-singers English and Korean whispers, rhythmic and on the edge of rap, fly over the club sounds, without ever being completely integrated into the mix. In some ways, Yaeji has tumbled upon the musical translation of a childhood that took her from the United States to South Korea, before being able to grow roots in either of the cultures. She has turned this fascinating lack of belonging into an infinite source of fascination.