Category Archives: 4Ever Songs

4Ever Songs: James “Getting Away with It (All Messed Up)”

James is known in America mostly for their song “Laid,” but they’ve had far greater success in their native England. “Getting Away with It (All Messed Up)” was the only single released on their ninth studio album, Pleased to Meet You, which came out on Mercury Records. It hit #22 on the UK charts and helped the LP go to #11 on the UK Album charts.

4Ever Songs: Dee-Lite ‘Groove is in the Heart’

30 years ago, a multicultural trio who found delights on New York City dancefloors released a single that merged funk, pop, and disco in a hip-hop collage style. ‘Groove is in the Heart’ is a colourful and infectious song that’s become an enduring classic

The band’s origins were similarly cosmopolitan. Deee-Lite were both very New York, their music slotting into the city’s decadent club scene, and globally disparate — DJ Dmitry was from Ukraine, Towa Tei from Tokyo, and Lady Miss Kier from the US — anticipating the explosion in global pop in the late 2010s.

4Ever Song: Pink Floyd ‘Wish You Were Here’

When Pink Floyd recorded their seminal album, Wish You Were Here, everything seemed perfect after the success of The Dark Side Of The Moon. The album had catapulted them into international superstardom and their rise to worldwide domination seemed within grasp.

For most bands, this would have been everything they’d ever have dreamed of achieving. However, for Pink Floyd, they felt the pressure heaped on their shoulders as a result of their previous triumph. Mortality was on their mind when they went into the studio to record the follow-up, Wish You Were Here, and the deterioration of their former bandmate Syd Barrett rested heavily on their collective consciousness.

4Ever Songs: Joe Smooth ‘Promised Land’

Then, there’s “Promised Land.” Three decades after its release, and after countless late-night airings, the song is a house music staple that has lost little of its power to work its magic on even the most jaded of dancers and the most cynical of revelers. Coming out in 1987 on Chicago’s essential D.J. International label, the original version was credited to Joe Smooth Inc.; later versions shortened that credit to Joe Smooth. And in typically casual early-house nomenclature, it was titled both “The Promised Land” and simply “Promised Land” on the label, with the latter becoming the standard moniker.

4Ever Songs: Spandau Ballet ‘True’

Spandau Ballet’s career had got off to a flying start with To Cut A Long Story Short and the success of their debut album, Journeys To Glory, in 1981, but they’d dipped in and out of the charts during the months that followed. The Diamond album had, however, served notice of the group’s ambition, and the five-piece returned to the UK Top 10 courtesy of Trevor Horn’s smart remix of Instinction, in early 1982. The following year, True became the song to finally take Spandau Ballet to the top of the UK singles chart, elevating them from New Romantic frontrunners to global pop stars.

4Ever Songs: The Nick Straker Band “A Walk In The Park”

The Nick Straker Band was a six-man Synthpop / New Wave / Jazz-Funk Fusion band out of London, several members of which were also in another London Synthpop group, New Musik, which which had three Top 40 U.K. singles in 1980.  Tony Mansfield (who has gone on to work with artists like The B-52’s, a-ha, The Damned, Captain Sensible and Naked Eyes) was the primary songwriter, producer, lead vocalist and frontman of New Musik and was one of the members of The Nick Straker Band. 

New Musik broke up in 1982, and between 1980 and 1984, The Nick Straker Band released 11 singles.  1980’s “A Walk In The Park” reached No. 20 on the U.K. singles chart.

4Ever Songs: Stereo MC’s ‘Connected’

The Stereo MCs are a British alternative hip-hop/electronic dance group founded by vocalist Rob Birch and Nick “The Head” Hallam in the mid-’80s. It took a while for a bunch of white Brits to be taken seriously in the hip-hop community, but they made some inroads with their 1990 album, Supernatural, when the single “Elevate My Mind” became the first British rap song to make the Billboard Hot 100. But the Stereo MCs didn’t truly achieve their mainstream breakthrough until the release of their third album, Connected, which went platinum in their native UK and stayed in the British Top 10 for nearly a year.