Category Archives: Il Dottore

Best Covers: Ty Segall ‘I’m a man’

It’s a covers LP deliciously titled Fudge Sandwich, and it’s due to hit shelves on October 26th through In the Red. On Fudge Sandwich, the garage rocker sinks his teeth into 11 “songs he loves. As a first taste of this album, Segall has served up his rendition of “I’m a Man”, the 1967 hit from Steve Winwood’s The Spencer Davis Group (a 1970 version by Chicago also was a success on the charts). Here, Segall infuses the blues rock original with a heavy dose of fuzzy feedback.

 

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Best Covers: Mac DeMarco ‘Honey Moon’

Indie rock hero Mac DeMarco has shared a cover from the catalog of legendary Japanese musician Haruomi Hosono, who founded popular Japanese rock band Happy End as well as the electronic trio Yellow Magic Orchestra. Mac offers up his take on Hosono’s “Honey Moon,” which originally appeared on Hosono’s 1975 album Tropical Dandy. Bonus, you get to hear Mac sing in Japanese. You can listen to Mac DeMarco’s cover of Haruomi Hosono’s “Honey Moon” in the video above.

Best Covers: Sharon Van Etten “New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down”

Sharon Van Etten reportedly hit the studio late last year to begin work on her follow-up to 2014’s impressive Are We There LP. In the meantime, she’s collaborated with artists like Lee Ranaldo, Maggie Rogers, Marissa Nadler, and Michael Cera (yup), in addition to contributing to the Twin Peaks reboot and reissuing her debut album. Now, she’s back with yet another new song to help pass the time, this time a cover of LCD Soundsystem’s “New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down”.

Filmed as part of BBC’s classical music concert series, BBC Proms, Van Etten was backed on the cover by the Heritage Orchestra for a performance at London’s Royal Albert Hall. The LCD cut is a fitting choice for the series, as this year’s theme is “New York: Sound of a City”.

Best Covers: Jose Gonzalez ‘Heartbeats’

Jose Gonzalez‘s stripped-down acoustic version of The Knife’s ubiquitous breakout hit allows the lyrics to take the forefront, and the crux of the song—one night of thrilling anxiety, passion, and consummation—appears as those moments often do: in slow motion. It’s an absolutely devastating interpolation of the track that strips away everything except for a voice and guitar, letting the words speak for themselves.