Category Archives: Les muses de La Musa

The muses of La Musa: Róisín Murphy

Róisín Murphy had never planned on being a singer. However, the echoes of that Sing it Back that made her famous with Moloko can still be heard all the way back from the 90s. Later, Róisín began a solo career of her own with which she achieved a privileged position in electronics: eclectic, experimental, daring and sometimes even misunderstood.

From a very young age she took a path that would lead her to many places: from experimental landscapes to the romantic territory of Italian ballads. Always ahead of the curve, Róisín has taken her interest in innovative designers and new talents to the stage, making her looks a fundamental part of her performances and turning herself into an icon of fashion.

As an artist, she has demonstrated excellent plasticity and has thus forged a name as legit as it is mysterious. Róisín is a clear disco reminiscence, an inevitable rhythmic flirtation and a singular force. On stage, she performs a dance pop exercise that shows her love for funk and disco. She has shared her swaggering new DJ Parrot produced single ‘Incapable’.

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The muses of La Musa: Sleater-Kinney

Sleater-Kinney came crashing out of the ’90s Pacific Northwest riot grrrl scene, setting a new bar for punk’s political insight and emotional impact. Hailed as “America’s best rock band” by Greil Marcus in Time Magazine, and as “America’s best punk band ever. EVER” by Rob Sheffield in Rolling Stone, the band put out seven searing albums in 10 years before going on indefinite hiatus in 2006.

Sleater-Kinney brought their 10-year hiatus to a close with the release of their 2015 album No Cities to Love, and the band hasn’t slowed down since that release. After teasing that a new album would be coming in 2019 and that St. Vincent would be handling production, the trio returned with “Hurry on Home,” the first single from their upcoming album The Center Won’t Hold. Now, the band is back with the album’s release date, as well as as another new single called “The Future Is Here.”

The muses of La Musa: Aurora

Mixing frosty electronic textures, spare beats, and clear, emotive vocals, Norwegian singer/songwriter AURORA works in a similar dark pop milieu as artists like Oh Land, Lykke Li, and Lorde. Born Aurora Aksnes near the city of Bergen, she began writing music and lyrics at a young age, eventually releasing her debut single, “Awakening,” in late 2013. Honing her live show and building on the momentum from the song, AURORA issued the follow-up single “Under Stars” in late 2014 and announced that she had signed with American label Glassnote. Her debut EP, Running with the Wolves, was released in the spring of 2015. The young singer/songwriter then came to further prominence, having covered the Oasis track “Half the World Away” for the 2015 John Lewis Christmas ad before following up with her debut full-length, All My Demons Greeting Me as a Friend, in 2016. It debuted at number one in Norway and charted across Western Europe. “Queendom,” the first taste of AURORA’s follow-up, was issued in April 2018.

Aurora has released her new album, ‘A Different Kind of Human’. it marks the 23-year-old Norwegian’s third full-length and forms the second part of last year’s surprise release, ‘Infections of A Different Kind’.

The muses of La Musa: Corine

Certain music is synonymous with France, from classic chanson to rebellious 60’s yé-yé, from “French Touch” electronic music, to the widescreen musical genius of Serge Gainsbourg. But it is the beautifully debauched world of 1970s French Boogie which Corine is resurrecting with her own brand of “erotic disco”. She looks every inch the authentic 70s diva with her distinctive shock of peroxide blonde hair, judicious use of eye shadow, and an extensive collection of jumpsuits. The name Corine is French prostitute slang for cocaine, and she dedicates her music to “the excess of the disco years, Le Palace, and its dancers who never grow tired”. Le Palace was a legendary Parisian nightclub on whose opening night in 1978 Grace Jones sang ‘La Vie en Rose’ from on top of a pink Harley Davidson, surrounded by shining roses and mountains of dry ice. Today in concert at Poble Espanyol.

The muses of La Musa: Aïsha Devi

Where am I? What is this? The future, the good life or Plato’s cave? No! It’s Aïsha Devi’s galaxy. This  producer performs sets where music is not the (only) protagonist. They are a spectacle, an experience. A mixture of extra-terrestrial sounds and philosophical-tantric visuals. The Swiss artist will present her most powerful non identified flying album to date: DNA Feelings. A journey that will take us all on a spaceship to the Devi mystical universe. After this abduction, you will never be the same again. We promise. Today at Primavera Sound.

The muses of La Musa: Soledad Vélez

Soledad Vélez, Chilean singer-songwriter based in Valencia, began her career in 2010 with Four Reasons to Sing, a debut EP that showed a personal sound close to folk and eclectic rock. A style that little by little she has left behind to get into the most vintage electronic music. Proof of this is her latest album Nuevas Épocas (Subterfuge Records, 2018), an album sung entirely in Spanish and that stands out for the use of synthesizers and keyboards. This summer at Vida Festival.

The muses of La Musa: Hatchie

If indie rock, hip hop, jazz, punk, electronic music and the rest of contemporary music have already found their millennial renovators, how was the dream pop of the school of Beach House and Cocteau Twins not going to? The dreamy dreamt dream is called Hatchie, but is actually the result of many sleepless nights for Harriette Pilbeam, bass player and singer songwriter who, when she feels like it is sweeter that any other. Sweet things never made anybody bitter, and less so the ones that this Australian artist is bringing to us: a celestial breathless voice, caramelised melodic choruses, drowsy guitars and bass, beating drums, synths and huge lines that are so catchy they radiate glitter.