Category Archives: Music by Bergman

Music by Bergman: Vessels

Leeds-based five-piece Vessels have shared the first cut to be taken from their new album, which is set to be released later this year.

Muscular, vibrant and euphoric, ‘Radiart’ is a hearty cut of dystopian techno that’s been cross pollinated with band’s penchant for playing live — and there’s no doubt in our mind ‘Radiart’ is going to be the centrepiece of the band’s forthcoming live shows when their as-yet unnamed new album drops later this year. Tonight in concert at Razzmatazz.

Music by Bergman: Boniface

Boniface is a new band from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Boniface released their first single “I Will Not Return as a Tourist” just last week and has already signed a deal with Transgressive Records who is home to artists like Alvvays, Flume, Foals, Two Door Cinema Club and more.  The track is overwhelmingly dream-like with its lo-fi production and airy synths. Most importantly, the track’s complexity is what makes it so intriguing; it’s difficult to define the genre it falls under. Some may call it indie while others could suggest it’s experimental.

 

Music by Bergman: Gabriel Garzón-Montano

With a Colombian father and French mother, the New Yorker Gabriel Garzón-Montano genuinely exemplifies the black and tropical movement currently shaping pop. Before releasing his debut album,Jardín (2017), he had already received support from pillars of the music community such as Mayer Hawthorne, who was the go-between between him and his label; Drake, who sampled his voice; and Lenny Kravitz, who called upon the artist to open for him on tour. In his music one can hear neo soul sophistication combined with hints of electronic and an exquisite sense of groove funk served on his own organic lattice. This saturday at Sala Apolo within the festival Primavera Club.

Music by Bergman: Blanck Mass

Whilst Fuck Buttons are immersed in the production of their long-awaited new album, one of its two members, Benjamin John Power, continues his explorations in a sphere somewhere between aggressiveness and electronic symphony under the alias Blanck Mass. In March he released his third album, World Eater (2017), which is inspired by the discontent arising from recent events to produce what he actually describes as love songs. Without giving up a certain pop vocation, he presents a brutal, dissonant and always euphoric music on what is probably his best album to date.

Music by Bergman: Superorganism

Everything that surrounds Superorganism is expectation and mystery. They came out of nowhere at the beginning of the year to rock the blogosphere with their intoxicating pop hit Something for your M.I.N.D., introducing themselves as a collective formed by Orono, the 17 year old Maine-resident Japanese girl and her seven London friends. The track quickly disappeared from the net for copyright issues, but not before seducing Frank Ocean, who played it on his radio show. In the past few months they have come back with two more happy-go-lucky tracks that confirm that they are the craziest most refreshing bands of the year.

Music by Bergman: King Krule

King Krule is Archy Marshall, who beat-sings poetry that tumbles up and down like a diary written in M.C. Escher-space, through a voice like a languorous boxing glove.

“Czech One,” Marshall’s first new song since 2013, is an appropriately named, tentative step back up to the mic and early morning toe-dip in the lake of his avant-lounge (or fauxotica-jazz, or absinthe-core).

Music by Bergman: Moon King

 

Crawling with musicians and performers, it’s not surprising that Daniel Benjamin, aka proto-house synth-pop outfit Moon King, decided to set up shop there.

Born in chilly Toronto, he grew obsessed with the Motor City’s vibrant underground dance scene and moved there last year to collaborate with local artists. Out of this creative environment came ‘Hamtramck ’16’, his new disco-flecked EP that fuses The Bee Gees’ catchy melodies with Prince’s jazz-pop rhythms.

‘In & Out’, the first single from the record isa far cry from Moon King’s past output as a shoegaze dream-pop duo – instead morphing into a thumping nu-soul jam à la Sister Sledge and Chic.