Category Archives: Music by Xavier Bergman

Music by Bergman: Gengahr

When Gengahr’s comeback single ‘Carrion’ rolls into life, the most noticeable change from their brilliant debut ‘A Dream Outside’ is the vocals of Felix Bushe. His floaty falsetto has become a snarling, swaggering voice, recalling Deerhunter’s Bradford Cox in its new-found twang. It provides a base on which the band take their sound to darker, heavier places.

Gengahr have announced plans for new album ‘Where Wildness Grows’ which will be set on March 9th, Tonight they play with Jungle at Razzmatazz.

 

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Music by Bergman: Vessels

Leeds-based five-piece Vessels have shared the first cut to be taken from their new album, which is set to be released later this year.

Muscular, vibrant and euphoric, ‘Radiart’ is a hearty cut of dystopian techno that’s been cross pollinated with band’s penchant for playing live — and there’s no doubt in our mind ‘Radiart’ is going to be the centrepiece of the band’s forthcoming live shows when their as-yet unnamed new album drops later this year. Tonight in concert at Razzmatazz.

Music by Bergman: Boniface

Boniface is a new band from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Boniface released their first single “I Will Not Return as a Tourist” just last week and has already signed a deal with Transgressive Records who is home to artists like Alvvays, Flume, Foals, Two Door Cinema Club and more.  The track is overwhelmingly dream-like with its lo-fi production and airy synths. Most importantly, the track’s complexity is what makes it so intriguing; it’s difficult to define the genre it falls under. Some may call it indie while others could suggest it’s experimental.

 

Music by Bergman: Gabriel Garzón-Montano

With a Colombian father and French mother, the New Yorker Gabriel Garzón-Montano genuinely exemplifies the black and tropical movement currently shaping pop. Before releasing his debut album,Jardín (2017), he had already received support from pillars of the music community such as Mayer Hawthorne, who was the go-between between him and his label; Drake, who sampled his voice; and Lenny Kravitz, who called upon the artist to open for him on tour. In his music one can hear neo soul sophistication combined with hints of electronic and an exquisite sense of groove funk served on his own organic lattice. This saturday at Sala Apolo within the festival Primavera Club.

Music by Bergman: Blue Hawaii

Tenderness is the first new material from Canadian artists Raphaelle Standell and Alexander Kerby (who also DJs under the name Agor) since 2013’s Untogether. Where that album was about the duo’s romantic breakup, the new one is inspired by mediating relationships through the internet and long-distance communication.

Arbutus Records says the album takes influences from ’90s dance music and “deep disco cuts,” mixed in with Standell’s acoustic guitar. Tenderness also features skits, spoken word sections and demos to help tell its story.

In the four years since Untogether, Standell has focused on her other band, Braids, while Kerby spent extended periods of time in LA and Berlin focusing on his DJ career.

Music by Bergman: Gold Connections

Although they only released their self-titled debut EP last March, Will Marsh, the brain behind Gold Connections, has been working on these tracks for years with the help of his illustrious university friend, Will Toledo, the soul of Car Seat Headrest, who produces the record as well as playing percussion, guitar and bass. The echoes of said band can be heard on this extended play that exudes the same post-adolescent suburban resignation via a slacker rock of dusty guitars. Fat Possum announces the release of their debut album at the end of this year, which should bring the new generations of indie to the forefront.

Music by Bergman: The Orwells

Still in their early 20s, The Orwells have already released two albums and toured with Arctic Monkeys. Their third album, Terrible Human Beings, feels like it should be the next precocious step in an upward progression for the Chicago area garage rockers; instead, it’s a competent but unspectacular offering that’s more likely to reinforce the band’s place as indie rock also-rans than take them to the next level. Today in concert at Sidecar.