Tag Archives: Primavera Sound

Primavera Sound 2019

The wildly popular Primavera Sound festival has announced the artists who will take to the stages in its 2019 edition, which will be held at the Parc del Fòrum in Barcelona from Friday, May 30 to Saturday, June 1. This year, half of the artists on the line-up are women, bringing more equality and just as much brilliance to the festival.

Rosalía, Solange, Janelle Monáe, Erykah Badu, Robyn and Miley Cyrus are tops among the list of women performing that also includes highlights like FKA Twigs, Carly Rae Jepsen and Courtney Barnet, plus stellar male artists such as Tame Impala, J Balvin, Future, James Blake and Kurt Vile & The Violators.

Key players who hit it big in the ’90s feature as usual, including Jarvis Cocker, Suede, Stereolab, Nas, Neneh Cherry, Róisín Murphy, Primal Scream, Guided by Voices, Built to Spill, Stephen Malkmus and Liz Phair, who also make room for new sensations of urban music and contemporary pop like Kate Tempest, Princess Nokia, Yung Beef, Empress Of, Charli XCX and Kali Uchis.

The eclectic line-up spans EBM from veterans Nitzer Ebb to alternative rock from Dirty Projectors, plus avant-garde pop from Julia Holter, club pop from Jungle, urban soul from Nathy Peluso, a load of reggaeton artists (Ivy Queen, DJ Playero, Japanese, Don Chezina, Hurricane G, Tony Touch) and much more.

As for electronic music, look out for Richie Hawtin, Nina Kraviz, Modeselektor, Helena Hauff, Objekt, Veronica Vasicka, Yves Tumor, Apparat, Suzanne Ciani, SOPHIE and Mykki Blanco, as well as artists in Primavera Bits, a festival within the festival on the other side of the Por Fòrum bridge.

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The muses of La Musa: Hatchie

If indie rock, hip hop, jazz, punk, electronic music and the rest of contemporary music have already found their millennial renovators, how was the dream pop of the school of Beach House and Cocteau Twins not going to? The dreamy dreamt dream is called Hatchie, but is actually the result of many sleepless nights for Harriette Pilbeam, bass player and singer songwriter who, when she feels like it is sweeter that any other. Sweet things never made anybody bitter, and less so the ones that this Australian artist is bringing to us: a celestial breathless voice, caramelised melodic choruses, drowsy guitars and bass, beating drums, synths and huge lines that are so catchy they radiate glitter.

The muses of La Musa: r.e.a.l.

They are not only a cool image, although you must see how scandalously magical their photos are. The temptation to get hooked on r.e.a.l just for their fashion design is overwhelming. The music by Isabel and Sara is above the rhetoric of fads and capital letters. The experimental electronic pop music, according to their own definition, of these two Madrid-based Galician artists draws you in because it appears before you soft and elegant and very refined. That is until you stretch out your hand and, ouch, it pricks. Like some of the names that they mention here and there in their interviews (Warpaint, King Krule, Jon Hopkins, Olafur Arnalds, Grimes…) their beauty is all the more beautiful because… it hurts.

Introducing…Big Thief

Surfing the tsunami of therapy often means realising that the simplest answers are the right ones. “Write, write, it’s therapeutic”, say the couch professors.  But whilst most people would do it in a small notebook that lives on their bedside table, Adrianne Lenker cures her insomnia, her ghosts of the past and present, the names in her life (Haley, Mary, Paul, Lorraine, Randy)… through songs. For the album covers of Masterpiece (2016) and Capacity (2017) Big Thief steals the most sacred memories, family snaps that show strange moments caught just a second after saying “cheese”, just when they let their guard down.  That is what her songs are like too, sung with echoes of both Hope Sadoval and Joni Mitchell:  comforting and strange, beautiful even though they thresh out childhood accidents and traumas (Mythological Beauty), and are recognisable as we recognise ourselves in our mothers and fathers, and they in us. Because often, not only are the simplest answers the right ones, but they are usually the same for everyone.

Favourite Gig: Billie Eilish 

Her first album hasn’t been released yet and she hasn’t even debuted live in our country, but Billie Eilish is on a roll. The new post-millennial pop star will be tonight in the Sant Jordi Club,

Every step of this Californian artist is a new milestone… and she isn’t even 18 yet! Any statistic or fact Billie Eilish one day has drastically changed the next: keeping track of her hundreds of millions of listens on streaming platforms is impossible, as is counting her army of followers or trying to predict her limit (if she has one that is). So for now we will content ourselves with the latest facts we know about her: her first album comes preceded by the icy Bury A Friend, probably her most ghostly and rawest track to date, and she has also contributed a song, When I Was Older, to the soundtrack inspired by Alfonso Cuarón’s film Roma.

The muses of The Musa: Erykah Badu

The tectonic plates move every time Erykah Badu wants them to. The first and strongest earth tremor was her debut in 1997, Baduizm. All those nostalgic for soul classics agreed about the excellence of that game-changing album (Erykah was the last link in the Diana Ross-Ann Peebles-Chaka Khan chain), as did the gourmets of black pop who came from the school of Janet Jackson and TLC and even the hip hop generation understood that that R&B was another dialect of the same language. But the earthquakes didn’t start and end then: with Mama’s Gun and Worldwide Underground Ms Badu even took on black rock (a terrain usually reserved for imitators of Hendrix) and with the incredible diptych New Amerykah, she took on the world of p-funk. Now after years of studio silence, only interrupted by a few mixtapes, the queen of afro has come back to the studio and stages to remind us that her elegant live performances are like a reverse striptease: every note, every word and every collaborator that dresses her show, make her more sensual, more exposed and more… Erykah.

Introducing…Amyl & The Sniffers

Where were you in 1977, Amy Taylor? The foul-mouthed singer of Amyl & The Sniffers wasn’t even born! As a matter of fact she was still a long way off (her birth certificate says…1996). Thinking about it, at that time her parents were kids who didn’t even listen to punk rock, they listened to AC/DC and Fleetwood Mac. Even so, when you’re hit with the ten angry eruptions of Big Attraction & Giddy Up you could imagine that Amy has shared rehearsal rooms, stages and pyjama parties with Poly Styrene, Ari Up and Ana da Silva. That’s how pure her Brit-punk repertoire sounds. Or better said, Aussie-punk, as they’re from Australia and pray to The Saints, The New Christs and The Birthday Party.